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Workshop - Economic Evaluations: what are the ethical implications for public health? - Peel Public Health 2014
The Centre's Olivier Bellefleur and independent researcher Michal Rozworski offered a completely reworked 90-minute workshop at Peel Public Health's Conference at Home, held on June 19, 2014.
Published in July 2014. Description. Download  1.39 MB.
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Invited by Peel Public Health to offer a workshop on the ethical implications that can underlie economic evaluations in public health, Olivier Bellefleur and Michal Rozworski took the opportunity to rework their workshop that they presented at The Ontario Public Health Conference (TOPHC) and the Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) Conferencethis year to tie it in even more closely with public health actors' practices.

The workshop objectives were to:

· Raise awareness that economic evaluations are not value neutral;


· Develop skills to critically analyze economic evaluations to identify the values they implicitly promote or downplay;


· Start reflecting on ways to present the results of economic evaluations to decision makers that make these values explicit and relevant in a given context.


To guide public health actors in the critical analysis of economic evaluations, the workshop was structured around a series of 10 questions that can help to identify the ethical implications of economic evaluations.

Economic Evaluations: what are the ethical implications
for public health?

51 slides
 1.39 MB
 Image - first page of the presentation - click to download

Related publication

You might also be interested in the following NCCHPP publication: “An Introduction to the Ethical Implications of Economic Evaluations for Healthy Public Policy.” To download this publication, click here.
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The production of the NCCHPP website has been made possible through a financial contribution from the Public Health Agency of Canada.